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" I have said that the soul is not more than the body, And I have said that the body is not more than the soul, And nothing, not God, is greater to one than one's self is, And whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own funeral drest in his... "
An American Bible - Page 124
edited by - 1918 - 372 pages
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History of American Literature

Reuben Post Halleck - 1911 - 431 pages
...his intense feeling of comradeship and his / sympathy with all.^-'Qne of his favorite verses was fl " And whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud." His Civil War experiences still further intensified this feeling. He looked on the lifeless face of...
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History of American Literature

Reuben Post Halleck - 1911 - 431 pages
...his intense feeling of comradeship and his sympathy with all. One of his favorite verses was " Anct "whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud." His Civil War experiences still further intensified this feeling. He looked on the lifeless face of...
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The Message of New Thought

Abel Leighton Allen - 1914 - 269 pages
...cannot properly manifest itself or find harmonious expression except in a healthy body. "I have said, the soul is not more than the body, and I have said the body is not more than the soul," says Walt Whitman. Carlyle says, "There is but one temple in the...
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Rabindranath Tagore: The Man and His Poetry

Basanta Koomar Roy - 1915 - 223 pages
...seek me, forsaking me?' " * Compare with this these lines of Walt Whitman, the American Vedantist: I have said that the soul is not more than the body,...nothing, not God, is greater to one than one's self is." So instead of being an ascetic Tagore became a pragmatist, for he held, as he holds today, that the...
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American Poets and Their Theology

Augustus Hopkins Strong - 1916 - 485 pages
...body, And I have said that the body is not more than the soul; ^And nothing, not God, is greater to me than one's self is, And whoever walks a furlong without...sympathy, walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud. (nd I say to mankind, Be not curious about God. In the faces of men and women I see God, and in my...
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From Friend to Friend: A Partnership in Friendship

1916 - 64 pages
...friends are best. King James used to call for his old shoes; they were easiest for his feet. —Seldtn WHOEVER walks a furlong without sympathy, walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud. — Whitman • THAT friendship which will not stand separation, will not last even if the parties...
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Whitman and Traubel

William English Walling - 1916 - 145 pages
...the individual (everyman). The following is, perhaps, the most illuminating passage on this point: And nothing, not God, is greater to one than one's self is. ... And I say to any man or woman, Let your soul stand cool and composed before a million universes. . . ....
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The Wonder Woman

Mae Van Norman Long - 1917 - 371 pages
...banks. I saw my mother's smile. I felt weak at that moment. I needed to grip hard a friendly hand. "Nothing, not God, is greater to one than one's self...sympathy walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud." Walt Whitman spoke truly. Someway I knew that Wanza's sympathy was true and exquisite, that her understanding...
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The Higher Powers of Mind and Spirit

Ralph Waldo Trine - 1917 - 241 pages
...advisedly. It is this obedience to the life of the spirit that Whitman had in mind when he said: " And whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud." It was the full flowering of the law of mutuality and service that he saw when he said: " I saw a city...
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The Sexual Crisis: A Critique of Our Sex Life

Grete Meisel-Hess - 1917 - 345 pages
...close this chapter by quoting the words of Walt Whitman, from the 48th stanza of the "Song of Myself": "Whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud." CHAPTER XXXIV CONCLUSIONS After Consideration, Action. Eugenics. The Woman's Movement: Tkt Economic...
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