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" For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see but means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure; The whole is either our cupboard of food, Or cabinet of pleasure. "
Works - Page 72
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1883
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The poetical works of George Herbert [and The synagogue, by C ..., Page 106

George Herbert - 1853
...all to all the world besides." u Head with foot hath private amity, And both with moons and tides." "His eyes dismount the highest star : He is in little...because that they Find their acquaintance there." " Each thing is full of duty" " More servants wait on Man, Than he'll take notice of : in every path...
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The Poetical Works of George Herbert

George Herbert, Christopher Harvey - 1853 - 328 pages
...all to all the world besides" " Head with foot hath private amity, And both with moons and tides." " His eyes dismount the highest star : He is in little...because that they Find their acquaintance there." " Each thing if full of duty." " More servants wait on Man, Than he'll take notice of : in every path...
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The Science of Health

Stephen Henry Ward - 1853 - 412 pages
...hath got so farre. But man hath caught and kept it as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest starre He is in little all the sphere. Herbs gladly cure...that they Find their acquaintance there. For us the windes do blow ; The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see, but means our...
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The Christian journal

1853
...littleness no longer appears »W we can exclaim, with George Herbert— " For DJ the winds do blow, Tlw earth doth rest, heaven move, and fountains flow : Nothing we see but means our good, As o«r delight or as our treasure, Tlie whole is cither our cupboard of food, Or cabinet of pleasure."...
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The Poetical Works of George Herbert

George Herbert, Christopher Harvey - 1853 - 328 pages
...say, " When we consider man, what (in grandeur, incomprehensibility, and terror) are the heavens ? " " For us the winds do blow ; The earth doth rest, heaven move, and fountains flow." Many of Herbert's modern admirers, while quoting the rest of these verses on " Man," omit its last...
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The Works of the Rev. George Herbert: With Remarks on His Writings, and a ...

George Herbert, William Jerdan - 1853 - 392 pages
...eyes difmount the higheft ftar : He is in little all the fphere. Herbs gladly cure our flefh, becaufe that they Find their acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow ; The earth doth reft, heaven move, and fountains flow. Nothing we fee, but means our good, As our delight, or as our...
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The Poetical Works of George Herbert: With Life, Critical Dissertation, and ...

George Herbert - 1853 - 328 pages
...amity, And both with moons and tides." " His eyes dismount the highest star : lie is in little all t/ie sphere. Herbs gladly cure our flesh, because that they Find their acquaintance there." " Each thing is full of duty" " More servants wait on Man, Than he'll take iwtico of : in every path...
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The Great Harmonia: The seer

Andrew Jackson Davis - 1853
...possessed the language, I could have truthfully exclaimed, in the words of the poet-psalmist, — " Herbs gladly cure our flesh, because that they Find their acquaintance there. * ***** All things unto our flesh. are kind." Understood in this high sense, how instructive and appropriate...
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The Poetical Works of George Herbert

George Herbert, Christopher Harvey - 1854 - 328 pages
...all to all the world besides." u Head with foot hath private amity, And both with moons and tides." " His eyes dismount the highest star : He is in little all the sphere. Herbs gladly cure our flesh, became that they Find their acquaintance there." " Each thing is full of duty" " More servants wait...
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Gleanings from the Poets: For Home and School

Anna Cabot Lowell - 1855 - 430 pages
...amity ; And both with moons and tides. Nothing hath got so far, But Man hath caught and kept it, as his prey* His eyes dismount the highest star ; He is,...acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow, The earth cloth rest, heaven move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see but means our As our delight, or as our...
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