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" For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see but means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure; The whole is either our cupboard of food, Or cabinet of pleasure. "
Works - Page 72
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1883
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Lectures on the Atomic Theory and Essays Scientific and Literary

Samuel Brown - 1858
...got so far, But Man hath caught and kept it as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star : He u in little all the sphere. Herbs gladly cure our flesh, because that they Find their acquaintance there. ' The stars have us to bed ; Night draws the curtain, which the suu withdraws : Music and light attend...
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Lectures on the Atomic Theory and Essays Scientific and Literary, Volume 2

Samuel Brown - 1858
...Man hath caught and kept it as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star : //• it in little att the sphere. Herbs gladly cure our flesh, because that they Find their acquaintance there. ' The stars have us to bed ; Night draws the curtain, which the sun withdraws: Music and light attend...
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Our Modern Athens: Or, Who is First? A Poem

William Adolphus Clark - 1860 - 70 pages
...then possessed the language, I could have truthfully exclaimed, in the words of the poet psalmist, ' Herbs gladly cure our flesh, because that they Find their acquaintance there. * * * * * All things unto our flesh are kind.' Tom Jones and Ned Smith were friends till proud Tom,...
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True Manhood: Its Nature, Foundation and Development. A Book for Young Men

William Landels - 1861 - 260 pages
...be turned to profitable account in the expansion of our minds, and the formation of our character. " For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heaven...good, As our delight, or as our treasure; The whole ia either our cupboard of food Or cabinet of pleasure. - " The stars have us to bed : Night draws the...
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Meliora, Volumes 3-4

1861
...world-book with more intelligent eye, and with a more devout heart, ready to say, with the quaint poet — ' For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heaven move, fiutl fountains flow ; Nothing we see but means our ;,'oou, As our ddirilit or as Our treasure. The...
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The Poetical Works of George Herbert: With a Memoir of the Author, & Notes

George Herbert - 1863 - 315 pages
...hath got so farre, But Man hath caught and kept it as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest starre : He is in little all the sphere. Herbs gladly cure our flesh, because that they Finde their acquaintance there. For us the windes do blow, The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains...
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Flowers and Fruit Gathered by Loving Hands from Old English Gardens

Emily Taylor - 1864 - 182 pages
...nothing for reward : O why should heavenly God to men have such regard ? SPENSER. MAN'S SERVANTS. j]OR us the winds do blow ; The earth doth rest, heaven...our delight or as our treasure : The whole is either cupboard of our food, Or cabinet of pleasure. The stars have us to bed ; Night draws the curtain, which...
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The Occident, and American Jewish advocate, ed. by I. Leeser, Volume 24

Isaac Leeser
...full of meaning, every line having as much matter as would suffice a modern poet for an entire stanza: For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heaven...Nothing we see but means our good, As our delight, or as OUT treasure ; The whole is either our cupboard of food, Or cabinet of pleasure. The stars have us...
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Miscellanies, Embracing Nature, Addresses, and Lectures

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1866 - 383 pages
...amity, And both with moons and tides. " Nothing hath got so far But man hath caught and kept it as his prey ; His eyes dismount the highest star ; He is...The earth doth rest, heaven move, and fountains flow j Nothing we see, but means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure ; The whole is either our...
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Poems of the Inner Life: Selected Chiefly from Modern Authors

Robert Crompton Jones - 1866 - 288 pages
...amity, And both with moons and tides. Nothing hath got so far, But man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star ; He is in...there. For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see, but means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure....
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