Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see but means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure; The whole is either our cupboard of food, Or cabinet of pleasure. "
Works - Page 72
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1883
Full view - About this book

Cassell's library of English literature, selected, ed. and arranged by H. Morley

Cassell, ltd - 1883
...kept it as his prey ; 20 His eyes dismount the highest star ; Ho ie in little all the sphere ; Herb» gladly cure our flesh, because that they Find their...acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow, The earth resteth, heaven moveth, fountains flow ; Nothing we see but means our good, As our delight or as our...
Full view - About this book

The Light of Life: Addresses to Young Men

Duncan M. West - 1883 - 323 pages
...designed to educate our souls for God. "For us the windes do blow, The earth doth rest, heav'n moves, and fountains flow, Nothing we see but means our good As our delight, or as our treasure ; The whole ia either our cupboard of food Or cabinet of pleasure. The starres have us to bed ; Night draws the...
Full view - About this book

Resurrection in Nature and in Revelation: An Argument and a Meditation

Daniel Worcester Faunce - 1884 - 230 pages
...amity, And both with moon and tides. " Nothing hath got so far But man hath caught and kept it as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star, He is, in little, all the sphere. Herbs cure our flesh because that they Find their acquaintance there." If then such be the world without...
Full view - About this book

Miscellanies

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1884 - 321 pages
...amity, And both with moons and tides. "Nothing hath got no far Bat man liath caught and kept it a* his prey ; His eyes dismount the highest star ; He is in little all the sphere. Herbi gladly cure our flesh, because that they Find their acquaintance there. " For us, the windi do...
Full view - About this book

The Cornhill Magazine

George Smith, William Makepeace Thackeray - 1874
...those lines of delightful old George Herbert, who himself possessed some share of the mystic gift : — For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heaven...means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure l The whole is either our cupboard of food, Or cabinet of pleasure. Now the main charge against the...
Full view - About this book

Backgrounds for the Bible

Michael Patrick O'Connor, David Noel Freedman - 1987 - 369 pages
...not mute, They go upon the score. Nothing hath got so far, But man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star: He is in...flesh; because that they Find their acquaintance there. Such legends have a fairy-tale feel: grass or vegetation derives from the hair of the primal man and...
Limited preview - About this book

George Herbert's Christian Narrative

Harold Toliver - 1989 - 288 pages
...hath got so farre, But Man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest starre: He is in little all the sphere. Herbs gladly cure our flesh; because that they Finde their acquaintance there. This has the look of an early poem (it is in the Williams manuscript)...
Limited preview - About this book

The Complete English Poems

George Herbert - 1991 - 460 pages
...both with moons and tides. Nothing hath got so far, But Man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. 2o His eyes dismount the highest star: He is in little...their acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow, 15 The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see, but means our good, As our...
Limited preview - About this book

Nature and Walking

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau - 1994 - 144 pages
...amity. And hoth with moons and tides. "Nothing hath got so far But man hath caught and kept it as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star, He is in little all the sphere Herhs gladly cure our flesh, hecause that they Find their acquaintance there "For us, the winds do...
Limited preview - About this book

George Herbert: The Critical Heritage

C. A. Patrides - 1995 - 390 pages
...and all to all the world besides. ' Head with foot hath private amity, And both with moons and tides. His eyes dismount the highest star: He is in little...flesh, because that they Find their acquaintance there. Each thing is full of duty. More servants wait on Man, Than he'll take notice of: in every path He...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF