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" At the same time, let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation whatsoever; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures,... "
The Living Age - Page 405
1849
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Celebrated Speeches of Chatham, Burke, and Erskine: To which is Added the ...

William Pitt (Earl of Chatham) - 1880 - 540 pages
...legislation whatsoever ; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. LORD CHATHAM'S SPEECH, IU THE HOUSE OF LORDS, JANUARY 9, 1770, IN REPLY TO LORD MANSHELD, ON THE FOLLOWING...
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The Loyalists of America and Their Times: from 1620 to 1816, Volume 1

Egerton Ryerson - 1880 - 489 pages
...of legislation, that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. " Let us be content with the advantage which Providence has bestowed upon us. We have attained the...
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Great orators, statesmen, and divines, brief lives with specimens of ...

Great orators - 1881
...legislation whatsoever; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. [On February 26, 1766, a bill was introduced repealing the Stamp Act; but a Declaratory Act was introduced,...
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The Development of Constitutional Liberty in the English Colonies of America

Eben Greenough Scott - 1882 - 334 pages
...Act." Polit. Deb. 7. " we may bind their trade, confine their >,n*nufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent." — [bid., 18. " The authority of Parliament was allowed tobe valid in nil laws, except such as should...
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A History of England in the Eighteenth Century, Volume 3

William Edward Hartpole Lecky - 1882
...legislation whatsoever ; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever — except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.' 1 These views were defended in the strongest terms by Lord Camden, who pledged his great legal reputation...
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A History of England in the Eighteenth Century, Volume 3

William Edward Hartpole Lecky - 1882
...that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever—except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.'' These views were defended in the strongest terms by Lord Camden, who pledged his great legal reputation...
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The Life of William Pitt, Volume 2: Earl of Chatham

Basil Williams - 1966 - 432 pages
...legislation whatsoever : that we may bind their trade, confine their manufacturers and exercise every power whatsoever — except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. Let us be content with the advantages which Providence has bestowed upon us. We have attained the highest...
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The Papers of Andrew Johnson: 1858-1860

Andrew Johnson, United States. President (1865-1869 : Johnson) - 1967 - 796 pages
...January 14, 1766, William Pitt (Lord Chatham) saw Parliament as supreme over America in every respect "except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent," and compared the situation with that of Wales, "that never was taxed by parliament, till it was incorporated."...
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The American Colonies: From Settlement to Independence

Richard C. Simmons - 1981 - 438 pages
...legislation whatever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent." Modern scholars now largely agree that Pitt, like most Americans, ' 'denounced all taxation of the...
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The Stamp Act Crisis: Prologue to Revolution

1953 - 327 pages
...legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent." 12 Parliamentary History, XVI, 90-97; Winstanley, Personal and Party Government, 256—259; Laprade,...
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