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" At the same time, let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation whatsoever; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures,... "
The Living Age - Page 405
1849
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The Long Fuse: How England Lost the American Colonies, 1760-1785

Don Cook - 1996 - 416 pages
...laws, by her regulations, and restrictions in trade, in navigation, in manufactures — in everything except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. Pitt was declaring on a grand scale what almost no other member of Parliament had dared say. Pitt was...
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Focus On U.s. History: The Era Of Revolution And Nation-forming:grades 7-9

Kathy Sammis - 1997 - 128 pages
...legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures,and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. Samuel Seabury, Tory bishop (1774) The power, or right, of the British Parliament to raise such a revenue...
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British Friends of the American Revolution

Jerome R. Reich - 1997
...legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent! [italics in original] As soon as news of Pitt's January 14 speech reached John Adams, he noted in his...
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States' Rights and American Federalism: A Documentary History

Lynn Nelson - 1999 - 232 pages
...Again he says: "We may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets, without their consent." Here then, my dear countrymen, ROUSE yourselves, and behold the ruin hanging over your heads. If you...
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American History Told by Contemporaries: Building of the Republic ..., Volume 2

Albert Bushnell Hart - 2002 - 676 pages
...legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. [John Almon, compiler], Anecdotes of the Life of the Right Hon. William Pitt, Earl of Chatham (London,...
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The Political Writings of Rufus Choate

Rufus Choate - 2002 - 432 pages
...colonies by her regulations and restrictions in trade, in navigation, in manufactures— in everything, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.' Again he says: 'We may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatever,...
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Tracts of the American Revolution, 1763-1776

Merrill Jensen - 2003 - 498 pages
...colonies by her regulations and RESTRICTIONS in trade, in navigation, in MANUFACTURES — in every thing, except that of taking their money out of their pockets, WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT." Again he says, "We may bind their trade, CONFINE THEIR MANUFACTURES, and exercise every power whatever,...
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Prologue to Revolution: Sources and Documents on the Stamp Act Crisis, 1764-1766

Edmund Sears Morgan - 1959 - 180 pages
...legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. 57. Rockingham's Formula for Repeal A. THE PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS PRECEDING THE DECLARATORY ACT I. Resolved,...
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The Library of Original Sources: Volume VII: Era of Revolution

Oliver J. Thatcher - 2004 - 456 pages
...legislation whatsoever ; that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent. The motion for the address received the approbation of all. About a month after, February 26th, 1766,...
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The Founding of a Nation: A History of the American Revolution, 1763-1776

Merrill Jensen - 2004 - 735 pages
...legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent." 28 Thus Pitt demanded repeal of the Stamp Act while at the same time insisting on a sweeping declaration...
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