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" ... Certainly, gentlemen, it ought to be the happiness and glory of a representative, to live in the strictest union, the closest correspondence, and the most unreserved communication with his constituents. "
The orator, a treasury of English eloquence - Page 6
by Orator - 1864
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America's British Culture

Russell Kirk - 1993 - 122 pages
...member in the House of Commons, Burke said, a representative is no mere delegate: His own unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you, or to any set of men living. These he does not derive from your pleasure— no, nor from the law and...
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Conscience in Politics: An Empirical Investigation of Swiss Decision Cases

Jürg Steiner - 1996 - 170 pages
...respect, their business unremitted attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose, his pleasure, his satisfactions, to theirs— and above all, ever,...all cases, to prefer their interest to his own." But then Burke continues: "Bui his unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he...
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The Mild Voice of Reason: Deliberative Democracy and American National ...

Joseph M. Bessette - 1997 - 289 pages
...Their wishes ought to have great weight with him; their opinion high respect; their business unremitted attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose,...cases, to prefer their interest to his own. But his unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you,...
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Edmund Burke: Selected Writings and Speeches

Edmund Burke - 1997 - 702 pages
...respect; their business unremitted attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose, his pleasure, his satisfactions, to theirs — and above all, ever,...cases, to prefer their interest to his own. But his unbiased opinion, his mature judoment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you,...
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Crown Powers, Subjects and Citizens

Christopher Vincenzi - 1998 - 343 pages
...wishes ought to have great weight with him; their opinions high respect; their business unremitted attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose,...cases, to prefer their interest to his own. But, his unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you,...
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Discovering Journalism

Warren G. Bovée - 1999 - 223 pages
...weight with him [the Member of Parliament]; their opinion, high respect; their business, unremitted attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose,...cases, to prefer their interest to his own. But his unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you,...
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Experiencing Politics: A Legislator's Stories of Government and Health Care

John E. McDonough - 2000 - 354 pages
...ought to have great weight with him; their opinion high respect; their business unremitted attenrion. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose, his pleasures, his satisfactions, to theirs — and ahove all, ever, and in all cases. to prefer their interest to his own. . . . Anyone who has served...
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The Uneasy Relationships Between Parliamentary Members and Leaders

Lawrence D. Longley, Reuven Y. Hazan - 2000 - 341 pages
...forth by Edmund Burke in a letter to his own constituents: 'his unbiased opinion, his mature judgement, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you, to any man. ... Your representative owes you, not his industry only, but his judgement; and he betrays, instead...
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Art and Representation: Contributions to Contemporary Aesthetics

Ananta Charana Sukla - 2001 - 282 pages
...respect; their business his unremitted attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his repose, his pleasure, his satisfactions, to theirs, — and above all, ever,...in all cases, to prefer their interest to his own. Even the staunchest defender of the resemblance theory will have rejoiced in this eloquent statement...
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The Federalist

Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay - 1996 - 572 pages
...strictest union, the closest correspondence, the most unreserved communication with his constituents. ... It is his duty to sacrifice his repose, his pleasures,...cases, to prefer their interest to his own. But his unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you....
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