Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
A Thousand and One Gems of English Prose - Page 92
1872 - 534 pages
Full view - About this book

Examples of English Prose: From the Reign of Elizabeth to the Present Time ...

George Walker - 1825 - 615 pages
...them, in my opinion, at least his equal, perhaps his superior. To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Shakspeare: From the Text of Johnson, Steevens, and Reed

William Shakespeare - 1825 - 896 pages
...reading was yet not rectified, nor his allusions understood ; jet then did Dryden pronounce, " that in my wish, To wish myself much better ; yet, for...thousand times more fair, ten thousand times More rich : whet he describes any thing, you more than see it, yoi feel it too. Those, who accuse him to have...
Full view - About this book

The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

Samuel Johnson - 1825
...yet not rectified, nor his allusions understood ; yet then did Dryden pronounce " that Shakespeare was the man, who, of all modern and, perhaps, ancient...nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriouslv, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those,...
Full view - About this book

A Universal Biography: Containing Interesting Accounts, Critical ..., Volume 5

John Platts - 1826
...is so ample and judicious that it renders further commendation superfluous. " Shakspeare," says he, "-was the man, who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily. When he describes any thing you more than see it, ; you feel it too. He needed not the spectacles of books to read nature;...
Full view - About this book

New Elegant Extracts: A Unique Selection ... from the Most Eminent Prose and ...

New elegant extracts, Richard Alfred Davenport - 1827
...is a circumstance which I imagine no other nation besides England can boast. BURKE. SHAKSPEARE. HE was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he...
Full view - About this book

New Elegant Extracts: A Unique Selection, Moral ..., Volume 2, Parts 3-4

Richard Alfred Davenport - 1827
...eminent a teacher, is a circumstance which I imagine no other nation besides England can boast. BURKE. HE was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he...
Full view - About this book

New Elegant Extracts: A Unique Selection ... from the Most Eminent Prose and ...

New elegant extracts, Richard Alfred Davenport - 1827
...is a circumstance which I imagine no other nation besides England can boast. BURKE. SHAKSPEARE. HE was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he...
Full view - About this book

Memorials of Shakspeare: Or, Sketches of His Character and Genius

Nathan Drake - 1828 - 494 pages
...matchless productions of this first of all dramatic writers. "Shakspeare was the man," he remarks, "who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
Full view - About this book

Memorials of Shakespeare; or, Sketches of his character and genius, by ...

Nathan Drake - 1828
...matchless productions of this first of all dramatic writers. "Shakspeare was the man," he remarks, "who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you f«; it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
Full view - About this book

Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Volume 1

John Timbs - 1829
...cant and vision are to the ear and eye, the same that tickling is to the touch. — Swift. ' CVll. Shakspeare was the man who, of all modern and perhaps...them not laboriously, but luckily; when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF