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" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
A Thousand and One Gems of English Prose - Page 92
1872 - 534 pages
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Volume 1

John Timbs - 1829
...Vor cant and vision are to the ear and eye, the same that tickling is to the touch. — Swift. CVII. feel it too. Those who. accuse him to have wanted...learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. Dryden. cvm. Pleasures are like poppies spread,...
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The Olio, Or, Museum of Entertainment, Volume 4

1830
...sister to Aaron." SHAESPEABE. Dryden, in one of his prefaces, speaking of our great dramatist, says, "He was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps, ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily; when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
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Studies in Poetry: Embracing Notices of the Lives and Writings of the Best ...

George Barrell Cheever - 1830 - 480 pages
...paragraph : — 'To begin then with Shakspeare. He was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps all ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive...when he describes anything you more than see it, you flel it too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted teaming, give him the greater commendation : he was...
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The Penny Magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge

1832
...mentioned, on his birth-day, in the year 1616, at the age of fifty-two. " Shakspeare," says Dryden, " was the man, who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...you more than see it — you feel it too. Those who uccuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation ; he was naturally learned ;...
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Some Account of the English Stage: From the Restoration in 1660 to ..., Volume 1

John Genest - 1832
...Greek and Latin, like a monarch, and what would have been theft in other poets, is only victory in him. Shakspeare was the man, who of all Modern, and perhaps...not laboriously, but luckily — when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too — those who accuse him to have wanted learning,...
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The plays and poems of Shakspeare [according to the text of E ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1832
...still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily : when be describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those, who...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he...
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Some Account of the English Stage: From the Restoration in 1660 to ..., Volume 1

John Genest - 1832
...still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily — when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too — those who...learned — he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature — he looked inwards and found her there — I cannot say he is every where alike; were...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ...

William Shakespeare - 1833 - 1064 pages
...was yet not rectified, nor his allusions understood ; yet then did Dry den pronounce, "thatShakspeare s) Fann'd with the eastern wind, turns to a crow,...bliss! Hel. O spite! O hell! I see you all are bent any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those, who accuse him to hav wanted learning, give...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - 1836
...opinion, at least his equal, perhaps his superior.* To begin then with Shakspeare. He was the man whq of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
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The Young Lady's Book of Elegant Prose: Comprising Selections from the Works ...

1836 - 320 pages
...it would lose in any other situation. MACKENZIE. SHAKSPEARE. HE was the man who of all modern, aud perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than sce it, you fcel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give...
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