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" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
A Thousand and One Gems of English Prose - Page 92
1872 - 534 pages
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The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare,: According to the Improved ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1844
...;-till present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but jackily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those, who...naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of bouks to read Nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. DRYUGN. A DC 4* v *» CONTENTS OF THE...
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Specimens of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical Notices, and ...

Thomas Campbell - 1844 - 716 pages
...into the world to blend experience with inspiration J. when he describes anything, you more than -ie the plain ground Apelles drew A circle regularly...this for me ? By it he presently will know How pain read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he...
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Lectures on the English Comic Writers

William Hazlitt - 1845 - 222 pages
...character of Shakspeare that has ever been written.* • " To begin, then, with Shakspeare: he w« the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient, poets...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards and found her there. I cannot say he u everywhere alike; were he so,...
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Lectures on the English Comic Writers

William Hazlitt - 1845 - 222 pages
...best character of Shakspeare that has ever been written.* * " To begin, then, with Shakspeare : he was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient,...luckily : when he describes anything, you more than sec it, you feel it, too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 57

1845
...of one's-self, and proclaiming it with the sound of a trumpet. " To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...them, not laboriously but luckily; when he describes any thing, you more than see it — you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning,...
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Studies in English poetry [an anthology] with biogr. sketches and notes by J ...

Joseph Payne - 1845
...interested ! Pars minima est ipse poeta sui" were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously hut luckily: when he describes anything, you more than...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 57

1845
...age ; and Sir Walter, that Jonson, " by dint of learning and " To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...them, not laboriously but luckily; when he describes any thing, you more than see it — you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning,...
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Literature, Ancient and Modern: With Specimens

Samuel Griswold Goodrich - 1845 - 336 pages
...full account of Shakspere, Bacon, and Milton, see .Famous Men of Modern Times. describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse...learned. He needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards and found her there." Another great man, who looms up in the distance...
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Literature, Ancient and Modern: With Specimens

Samuel Griswold Goodrich - 1845 - 336 pages
...thus briefly but happily delineated by Dryden : " He was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps all ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive...drew them, not laboriously, but luckily ; when he * For a full account of Shakspere, Bacon, and Milton, see Famma Men of Modern Times. describes any...
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Specimens of the British Critics

John Wilson - 1846 - 344 pages
...of one's-self, and proclaiming it with the sound of a trumpet. " To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...luckily; when he describes anything, you more than see it—you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation...
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