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" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
A Thousand and One Gems of English Prose - Page 92
1872 - 534 pages
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Bibliotheca Sacra and Theological Review, Volume 4

1847
...so well excelled himself, says: " He was a man of all the moderns and perhaps the ancient poets who had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inward and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so,...
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Introduction to the Literature of Europe in the Fifteenth ..., Volume 2

Henry Hallam - 1847
...Even Dryden, who came in a worse period, and had no undue reverence for Shakspeare, admits that " he was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...accuse him to have wanted learning give him the greater recommendation ; he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he...
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Bits of books, from old and modern authors, for railway travellers

Bits - 1847 - 72 pages
...when he cared less to keep on the mask.—Clarendon. SHAKESPEARE. To begin then, with Shakspeare. He was the man, who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...luckily. When he describes anything, you more than see it—you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation....
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An Essay on English Poetry: With Notices of the British Poets

Thomas Campbell - 1848 - 436 pages
...of blemishes to be deducted from his merits is not great,f and we should scarcely be thankful * [He (Shakspeare) was the man who of all modern, and perhaps...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he...
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An Essay on English Poetry; with notices of the British poets. [Edited by ...

Thomas Campbell - 1848 - 436 pages
...of blemishes to be deducted from his merits is not great, f and we should scarcely be thankful * [He (Shakspeare) was the man who of all modern, and perhaps...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he...
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The Ladies' Repository, Volume 6

1848
...which Dr. Blair quotes with approhation, "as not only just, hut uncommonly elegant and happy." " He was the man who, of all modern, and, perhaps, ancient...nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not lahoriously, hut luckily. When ho descrihes any thing, you more than see it — you feel it, too. They...
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Lectures on the English Poets

William Hazlitt - 1849 - 255 pages
...best character of Shakspeare that has ever been written.* * " To begin, then, with Shakspeare : he was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient,...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he...
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Studies of Shakspere, forming a companion volume to every edition ..., Volume 86

Charles Knight - 1849
...imaginary conversation in which the Earl of Dorset bears a part : " To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he...
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Studies of Shakspere: Forming a Companion Volume to Every Edition of the Text

Charles Knight - 1849 - 360 pages
...imaginary conversation in which the Earl of Dorset bears a part : " To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...he drew them not laboriously, but luckily : when he deseribes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning...
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Studies in Shakespeare, Bibliography, and Theatre

James G. McManaway - 1990 - 417 pages
...sums up die situation neatly in his Of Dramatic Poesy, An Essay: To begin, then, with Shakespeare: he was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learn 'd; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature, he look'd inwards, and found her there....
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