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" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
A Thousand and One Gems of English Prose - Page 92
1872 - 534 pages
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Sources of Dramatic Theory: Volume 1, Plato to Congreve

Michael J. Sidnell, Sidnell Michael J., D. J. Conacher - 1991 - 317 pages
...them, in my opinion, at least his equal, perhaps his superior, To begin, then, with Shakespeare, He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them, not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
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William Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage, Volume 5

Brian Vickers - 1995 - 568 pages
...was yet not rectified, nor his allusions understood; yet then did Dryden pronounce that Shakespeare 'was the man, who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily. When he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
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Textual Practice 10.3

Alan Sinfield - 1996 - 167 pages
...the regulatory and formulaic Corneille and other French writers: To begin then with Shakespeare. He was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily. . . . Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation. He was naturally...
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George Frideric Handel

Paul Henry Lang - 1996 - 731 pages
...What Dryden, in his Essay on Dramatic Poesy, said concerning Shakespeare applies equally to Handel: "All the images of nature were still present to him,...anything, you more than see it, you feel it too." Yet while Handel describes a landscape or a bucolic scene with incomparable felicity, his music can...
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Studies in Criticism and Aest

Howard Anderson - 1999 - 419 pages
...proportion in the name of the disegno interno, the inward drawing, or idea. 36 ) Shakespeare, says Dryden, was "the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily " 37 The distinction between luck and labor, made by Dryden in favor of luck and Shakespeare, exploited...
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Collected Works Of Samuel Alexander

Samuel Alexander - 2000 - 1988 pages
...and perhaps ancient poets had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were present to him, and he drew them not laboriously but...who accuse him to have wanted learning give him the great commendation. He was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature;...
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The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare

Ed. de Grazia - 2001 - 328 pages
...- for his versification, his diction, his classical correctness - but that he loved Shakespeare: He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily . . . Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally...
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Restoration Literature: An Anthology

Paul Hammond - 2002 - 437 pages
...Beaumont and Fletcher. The present extract is spoken by Neander. To begin, then, with Shakespeare: he was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so,...
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The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Stage

Stanley Wells, Sarah Stanton, Wells Stanley - 2002 - 322 pages
...playwrights of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as contemporary France, Dryden wrote: '[Shakespeare] was the man who of all Modern and perhaps Ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too', concluding that while he admired Jonson's learning,...
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The Major Works

John Dryden - 2003 - 967 pages
...them, in my opinion, at least his equal, perhaps his superior. 'To begin then with Shakespeare. He was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...learned. He needed not the spectacles of books to read nature. He looked inwards, and found her there. 'I cannot say he is everywhere alike. Were he...
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