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" For, wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy... "
Chambers's Edinburgh Journal - Page 59
1844
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The Works of Dugald Stewart: Dissertation exhibiting a general view of the ...

Dugald Stewart - 1829 - 518 pages
...wit, and prompt memories, have not always the clearest judgment, or deepest reason. For Wit, lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety, ichtrein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures, and agreeable...
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Elements of Criticism

Lord Henry Home Kames - 1830 - 490 pages
...thought, is that only which is taken notice of by Addison, following Locke, who defines it " to lie in the assemblage of ideas ; and putting those together,...pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy."* It may be defined more concisely, and perhaps more accurately, " A junction of things by distant and...
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The Spectator, Volume 1

1830
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Thoughts on laughter, by a chancery barrister [B. Montagu.].

Basil Montagu - 1830 - 92 pages
...and pat' ting those together with quickness and variety, wherein can be found the least difference or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy : judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully one from another,...
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A system of phrenology

George Combe - 1830
...definition of Wit. LOCKE describes Wit as " lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting these together with quickness and variety, wherein can be found any resemblance or congruityt t/iereby to make up pleasant pictures, and agreeable visions in the fancy *." - Essiv, b....
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Epitome of English literature; or, A concentration of the matter ..., Volume 3

English literature - 1831 - 536 pages
...not always the greatest judgment; for wit lying chiefly in the assemblage of ideas, and putting these together with quickness and variety wherein can be...or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures in the fancy; judgment, on the contrary, lies in separating carefully ideas, wherein can be found a...
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The Spectator: With Sketches of the Lives of the Authors, an Index ..., Volume 2

1832 - 282 pages
...wit and prompt memories, have not always the clearest judgment, or deepest reason. — For wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety, wherein can oe found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in...
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The Philomathesian, Volume 1

1834 - 392 pages
...». R. ». WIT. WIT, common!/ denominated a faculty of the mind, has beea defined by Locke as " lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those...pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy. " We shall make no farther attempt at a definition of this word, but leave that to our readers, and...
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Literary Remains of the Late William Hazlitt: With a Notice of His Life by ...

William Hazlitt - 1836 - 374 pages
...clearest judgment, or deepest reason. For wit lyin^j most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting them together with quickness and variety, wherein can be...pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy ; judgment on the contrary lieз quite on the other side, in separating carefully one from another...
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The Spectator: With Notes and a General Index, Volumes 1-2

1836 - 938 pages
...wit, and prompt memories, have not always the clearest judgment or deepest reason. ' For wit lying have a kind of dependence upon one another, and be...every degree produces something peculiar to it. The fo np pleasant pictures, and agreeable visions in the fancy; judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on...
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