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" For, wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy... "
Chambers's Edinburgh Journal - Page 59
1844
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Literary Remains of the Late William Hazlitt, Volume 1

William Hazlitt - 1836
...clearest judgment, or deepest reason. For wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting them together with quickness and variety, wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to quote chiefly as an instance of our "author's power of imagination, is as follows. In speaking of the...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: The Tatler. The Guardian. The Freeholder. The ...

Joseph Addison - 1837
...given us the best account of wit, in abort, that can any where be met with. " Wit," saya he, " lies in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together...pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy." Thus does true wit, as this incomparable author observes, generally consist in the likeness uf ideas,...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator, no. 1-314

Joseph Addison - 1837
...always the clearest judgment or deepest reason.' For •wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, r and putting those together with quickness and variety,...pleasant pictures, and agreeable visions in the fancy; judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating «carefully one from another,...
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A System of Phrenology

George Combe - 1837 - 664 pages
...ideas, and putting these together with quickness and variety, wherein can be found any resembla.net or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures, and agreeable visions in the fancy.*" Now, it may be demonstrated, that this definition is erroneous. For example, when Goldsmith, in his...
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Conversations on the elements of metaphysics, tr. by R. Pennell

Claude BUFFIER - 1838 - 200 pages
...considered these faculties as the characteristics respectively of wit and judgment. " Wit lying most on the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together,...pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy. Judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully, one from another,...
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The Phrenological Journal, and Magazine of Moral Science, Volume 11

1838
...reflect on and observe in itself," that it lies " most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting them together with quickness and variety, wherein can be...pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy," and says, " it is a kind of affront to go about to examine it by the severe rules of truth and good...
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A System of Phrenology

George Combe - 1838 - 664 pages
...definition of Wit. Locke describes Wit as "lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting these together with quickness and variety, wherein can be...pleasant pictures, and agreeable visions in the fancy.*" Now, it may be demonstrated, that this definition is erroneous. For example, when Goldsmith, in his...
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Synonymisches Handwörterbuch der englischen Sprache für die Deutschen

H. M. Melford - 1841 - 448 pages
...humour, jarte Sdjíufifotgcn auê ber .Knintnip béé (5barattcr¿. Laboured or forced wit is no wit. Wit lies most in the assemblage of ideas , and putting those together with quickness and variety. (Addison.) Scott's humour in conversation, as in his works, was genial, and free from all causticity....
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English Synonymes: With Copious Illustrations and Explanations, Drawn from ...

George Crabb - 1841 - 535 pages
...deep thinker, and elicits truth* which are in vain suught for with any severe effort: ' Wit lie« more in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety.'— ADDIS о я. Humour is a •pecies of wit which flowa oat of the humour of а peñón; For «ire by...
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A System of Phrenology

George Combe - 1842 - 516 pages
...wit is actually extinguished ? This leads me to a definition of wit. Locke describes it as " lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those...pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy."* Now, it may be demonstrated, that this definition is erroneous. For example, when Goldsmith, in his...
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