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" So all night long the storm roared on: The morning broke without a sun; In tiny spherule traced with lines Of Nature's geometric signs, In starry flake, and pellicle All day the hoary meteor fell; And, when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world... "
New National First[ -fifth] Reader - Page 394
by Charles Joseph Barnes, J. Marshall Hawkes - 1884
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Advanced Readings and Recitations

Austin Barclay Fletcher - 1881 - 450 pages
...speak ; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply. None? Then none have I offended. I have done no Around the glistening wonder bent The blue walls of...sky and snow ! The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous shapes ; strange domes and towers Rose up where sty or corn-crib stood, Or garden wall,...
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The Poetical Works

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1881 - 543 pages
...In starry flake, and pellicle, All day the hoary meteor fell ; And, when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could...wonder bent The blue walls of the firmament, No cloud ahove, no earth below, — A universe of sky and snow ! The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous...
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The Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1881 - 543 pages
...In starry flake, and pellicle, All day the hoary meteor fell ; And, when (he second morning shone. We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could call our own. Around the glistening wonder bent 1 he blue walls of the firmament, No cloud above, no earih below, — A universe ot sky and snow !...
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The Whittier Birthday Book

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1881 - 402 pages
...In starry flake, and pellicle, All day the hoary meteor fell ; And, when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could call our own. The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous shapes ; strange domes and towers Rose up where sty...
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Illustrated Birthday Book of American Poets

Almira Leach Hayward - 1881 - 307 pages
...; All day the hoary meteor fell, And when the second morning shone We looked upon a world unknown ; No cloud above, no earth below, — A universe of sky and snow ! y. G. Whittier. Lament who will, in fruitless tears, The speed with which our moments fly; I sigh...
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Snow Dreams, Or, Funny Fancies for Little Folks

Jessie Margaret Edmondston Saxby - 1882 - 111 pages
...ONE WEE LASSIE," "STORIES OF SHETLAND," ETC., ETC. WITH ADDITIONS BY " AUNTIE" Around the glittering wonder bent The blue walls of the firmament ; No cloud above, no earth below — An universe of sky and snow ! — WhittUr. EDINBURGH JOHNSTONS, HUNTER, & COMPANY EDINBURGH : I'RINTED...
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The Yale Literary Magazine, Volume 47

1882
...on that bleak December morning " Looking upon a world unknown On nothing we could call our own — No cloud above, no earth below— A universe of sky and snow." In this truly American ballad, Whittier has given us many exquisite bits of word-painting. A lesser...
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Pepacton

John Burroughs - 1881 - 260 pages
...yet been put into poetry. What an exact description is this of the morning after the storm : — " We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could...above, no earth below, — A universe of sky and snow." In his little poem on the May-flower, Mr. Stedman catches and puts in a single line a feature of our...
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New National Third Reader

Charles Joseph Barnes - 1884 - 240 pages
...and recrossed the winged snow: And ere the early bedtime came The white drift piled,the window-frame, And through the glass the clothes-line posts Looked...garden wall, or belt of wood; A smooth, white mound the brush-pile showed, A fenceless drift what once was road; The bridle-post an old man sat With loose-flung...
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The Elements of English Composition: A Preparation for Rhetoric

Lucy A. Chittenden - 1884 - 174 pages
...signs, In starry flake, and pellicle, All day the hoary meteor fell; And, when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could...sky and snow! The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous shapes; strange domes and towers Rose up where sty or corn-crib stood, Or garden wall, or...
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