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" So all night long the storm roared on: The morning broke without a sun; In tiny spherule traced with lines Of Nature's geometric signs, In starry flake, and pellicle All day the hoary meteor fell; And, when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world... "
New National First[ -fifth] Reader - Page 394
by Charles Joseph Barnes, J. Marshall Hawkes - 1884
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A Hand-book of English and American Literature: Historical and Critical ...

Esther J. Trimble Lippincott - 1884 - 518 pages
...never! From SNOW-BOUND. So all night long the storm raved on:— And, when the second morning shone, AVe looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could call...sky and snow! The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous shapes; strange domes and tower. Rose up where sty or corn-crib stood, Or garden wall, or...
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Pepacton [essays]. Author's ed

John Burroughs - 1884
...yet been put into poetry. What an exact description is this of the morning after the storm : — " We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could...above, no earth below, — A universe of sky and snow." In his little poem on the May-flower, Mr. Stedman catches and puts in a single line a feature of our...
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The Elements of English Composition: A Preperation for Rhetoric

Lucy A. Chittenden - 1884 - 174 pages
...signs, In starry flake, and pellicle, All day the hoary meteor fell; And, when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could...cloud above, no earth below,— A universe of sky and snowl The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous shapes; strange domes and towers Rose up where...
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Birds and poets, with other papers. Author's ed

John Burroughs - 1884
...those white angelic days we have in winter, such as Whittier has so well described in these lines : — "Around the glistening wonder bent The blue walls...above, no earth below, A universe of sky and snow. " On such days my spirit gets snow blind ; all things take on the same colour, or no colour ; my thought...
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Popular Poetic Pearls: And Biographies of Poets

Frank McAlpine - 1885 - 384 pages
...signs, In starry flake, and pellicle, All day the hoary meteor fell; And, when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could call our own. Around the glistening wonder hent The blue walls of the firmament; No cloud above, no earth below, — A universe of sky and snow...
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Popular Educator, Volume 11

1893
...collection of pressed leaves, the teacher will be well equipped with material for work when without is " No cloud above, no earth below, — A universe of sky and snow." The study of roots and stems can be postponed till the late fall when other material fails. С. Н. Morse....
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Poets of America

Edmund Clarence Stedman - 1885 - 516 pages
...grotesque. The whole transfiguration is recalled : " The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous shapes ; strange domes and towers Rose up where sty or corn-crib stood, Or garden-wall, or belt of wood ; The bridle-post an old man sat With loose-flung coat and high cocked...
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Poets of America

Edmund Clarence Stedman - 1885 - 516 pages
...grotesque. The whole transfiguration is recalled: "The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous shapes; strange domes and towers Rose up where sty or corn-crib stood, Or garden-wall, or belt of wood; The bridle-post an old man sat With loose-flung coat and high cocked...
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Text and verse for every day of the year: Scripture passages and parallel ...

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1885 - 145 pages
...All day the hoary meteor fell ; And when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world unknown. No cloud above, no earth below, — A universe of sky and snow ! SNOW-BOUND. February (Second Month) 22. The meek will he guide in judgment, and the meek will he...
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Poetical Works

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1886 - 344 pages
...In starry flake, and pellicle, All day the hoary meteor fell ; And, when the second morning shone, We looked upon a world unknown, On nothing we could...sky and snow ! The old familiar sights of ours Took marvellous shapes ; strange domes and towers Rose up where sty or corn-crib stood, Or garden-wall,...
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