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" When now I think you can behold such sights, And keep the natural ruby of your cheeks, When mine are blanch'd with fear. "
Works - Page 39
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1883
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Vibration the Law of Life

W. H. Williams - 1996 - 80 pages
...tatters and rags, look as grotesque and fantastical as Jack Falstaff and his recruits. Can such thihgs be and overcome us like a summer's cloud without our special wonder? May we not be permitted to inquire where we are AT? Is there no truth? Is man forever—from the cradle...
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Human Life and the Natural World: Readings in the History of Western Philosophy

Owen Goldin, Patricia Kilroe - 1997 - 268 pages
...allegories. This relation between the mind and matter is not fancied by some poet, but stands in the will of God, and so is free to be known by all men. It appears to men, or it does not appear. ... It is the standing problem which has exercised the wonder and the study of every fine genius since...
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Moments of Moment: Aspects of the Literary Epiphany

Wim Tigges - 1999 - 496 pages
...matter, Emerson explains, "is not fancied by some poet, but stands in the will of God, and so is true to be known by all men. It appears to men, or it does not appear" (24). It is 2. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays and Poems, ed. Joel Porte, Harold Bloom, and Paul Kane,...
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"A Time to Heal": The Diffusion of Listerism in Victorian Britain

Jerry L. Gaw - 1999 - 173 pages
...To jolt them out of their complacency, he quoted from Macbeth, in which Shakespeare wrote, Can such things be, And overcome us like a summer's cloud Without our special wonder?33 Indeed, one wonders whether Lister's condescending attitude toward the London medical establishment...
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Tales of Soldiers and Civilians: and Other Stories

Ambrose Bierce - 2000 - 304 pages
...From Macbeth 3. iv. After the appearance of Banquo's ghost, Macbeth exclaims to Lady Macbeth: Can such things be, And overcome us like a summer's cloud, Without our special wonder? You make me strange Even to the disposition I owe, When now I think you can behold such sights And...
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The Esoteric Origins of the American Renaissance

Arthur Versluis - 2001 - 240 pages
...laws than its own, shines through it."13 Miracles can indeed happen. In the face of such miracles, "the wise man doubts, if, at all other times, he is not blind and deaf." Our purpose as human beings is to become divine and to incarnate this world of archetypes. If "every...
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Nothing Abstract: Investigations in the American Literary Imagination

Tom Quirk - 2001 - 234 pages
...Macbeth. Shortly after the appearance of Banquo's ghost, Macbeth exclaims to Lady Macbeth: Can such things be, And overcome us like a summer's cloud, Without our special wonder? You make me strange Even to the disposition I owe, When now I think you can behold such sights And...
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Orson Welles on Shakespeare: The W.P.A. and Mercury Theatre Playscripts

Orson Welles - 2001 - 297 pages
...furious) You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting With most admired disorder. MACBETH Can such things be, And overcome us like a summer's cloud Without our special wonder? (He sinks to the steps of the throne. The court crowds around him. Ross is at his side.) MACBETH (to...
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Emerson, Romanticism, and Intuitive Reason: The Transatlantic "light of All ...

Patrick J. Keane - 2005 - 555 pages
...Emerson in the "Language" chapter of Nature, "is not fancied by some poet, but stands in the will of God, and so is free to be known by all men. It appears to men or it does not appear" (E&L 24). The phrase of Plotinus alluded to in that final sentence27 had appeared earlier, in an 1835...
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The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - 2005 - 896 pages
...You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting, With most admired disorder. MACBETH Can such things be, And overcome us like a summer's cloud, Without our special wonder? You make me strange Even to the disposition that I owe, When now I think you can behold such sights,...
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