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" It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery we have made that we exist.* That discovery is called the Fall of Man. Ever afterwards we suspect our instruments. We have learned that we do not see directly, but mediately, and that we have... "
Works - Page 99
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1883
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Emerson and Self-reliance

George Kateb - 2002 - 221 pages
...case for the value of experiencing, he must allow himself the utterance of disappointment. He says, It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...Ever afterwards we suspect our instruments. We have teamed that we do not see directly, but mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored...
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Framing Hitchcock: Selected Essays from the Hitchcock Annual

Christopher Brookhouse, Richard Allen, Sabrina Barton, John A. Bertolini, Lesley Brill, Joseph Garncarz, Joan Hawkins, Christopher Morris, Thomas Hemmeter, Thomas Leitch, Frank M. Meola, James Naremore, Leland Poague, Charles L. P. Silet, David Sterritt, Sarah Street, James M. Vest - 2002 - 418 pages
..."the discovery we have made, that we exist" is "the Fall of Man," which he links to uncertain vision: Ever afterwards, we suspect our instruments. We have...mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored and distorting lenses which we are, or of computing the amount of their errors. Perhaps these...
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Speaking of Beauty

Denis Donoghue - 2003 - 209 pages
...has the modern consequence of self-consciousness. Emerson is its philosopher, as in "Experience": "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored and distorting lenses which we are, or of computing the amount of their errors."7 Socially,...
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Emerson's Life in Science: The Culture of Truth

Laura Dassow Walls, John H Bennett Jr Chair of Southern Letters Laura Dassow Walls, Laura Dassow - 2003 - 280 pages
...selfconsciousness divides humanity from all nature. Thus, in one of Emerson's most depressive utterances: "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored and distorting lenses which we are, or of computing the amount of their errors. Perhaps these...
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Emerson

Lawrence Buell - 2004 - 416 pages
...This from the magnificent passage toward the end that leads off with the astounding pronouncement, "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...we exist. That discovery is called the Fall of Man" (43). Emerson calls this 214 realization "unhappy," and doubtless with one side of his mind actually...
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Emerson's Transcendental Etudes

Stanley Cavell, David Justin Hodge - 2003 - 277 pages
...writer gives as to his whereabouts, as to where he may be discovered, and as to what he has found: "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...exist. That discovery is called the Fall of Man." And two paragraphs earlier: "I am ready to die out of nature and be born again into this new yet unapproachable...
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Minding American Education: Reclaiming the Tradition of Active Learning

Martin Bickman - 2003 - 182 pages
...post-Edenic Adam. (Frye, 1968, pp. 17-18) As Emerson remarks of this original sin of self-consciousness: "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...we exist. That discovery is called the Fall of Man" (1983, p. 487). This feeling of separation creates a dualism between the self and the outside world,...
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A Dream Too Wild: Emerson Meditations for Every Day of the Year

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 2004 - 392 pages
...God"? Do you still look to "the phraseology of some old mouldered nation" for knowledge of God? It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored and distorting lenses which we are, or of computing the amount of their errors. Perhaps these...
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The Spiritual Emerson: Essential Writings by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 2004 - 280 pages
...them in and make affirmations outside of them.just as much as it must include the oldest beliefs. It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...our instruments. We have learned that we do not see direcdy, but mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored and distorting lenses...
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Pragmatism: Critical Concepts in Philosophy, Volume 4

Russell B. Goodman - 2005 - 382 pages
...means of it. "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped," Emerson calmly remarks in "Experience," "the discovery we have made, that we exist. That discovery...Man. Ever afterwards, we suspect our instruments." Complaints about these "instruments" — what Santayana calls "the kindly infidelities of language"...
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