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" It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery we have made that we exist.* That discovery is called the Fall of Man. Ever afterwards we suspect our instruments. We have learned that we do not see directly, but mediately, and that we have... "
Works - Page 99
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1883
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Emerson, Romanticism, and Intuitive Reason: The Transatlantic "light of All ...

Patrick J. Keane - 2005 - 555 pages
...later, he inserts the corrective note that, in a postlapsarian world, our instruments are "suspect." We have learned that "we do not see directly, but...these coloured and distorting lenses which we are." Perhaps "these subject-lenses have a creative power; perhaps there are no objects. Once we lived in...
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Poetry, Politics, and Culture: Argument in the Work of Eliot, Pound, Stevens ...

Harold Kaplan - 279 pages
...more complicated than that as Emerson himself explained in a passage from his essay "Experience." It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored and distorting lenses which we are, or of computing the amount of their errors. Perhaps these...
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Stanley Cavell's American Dream: Shakespeare, Philosophy, and Hollywood Movies

Lawrence F. Rhu - 2006 - 248 pages
...thus becomes a condition for philosophical progress. In "Experience," Emerson puts it this way: "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...called the Fall of Man. Ever afterwards we suspect our own instruments." 61 Stella Dallas and A Thousand Acres This idea recurs under the Nietzschean rubric...
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Philip Roth's Rude Truth: The Art of Immaturity

Ross Posnock, Associate Professor of English Ross Posnock - 2006 - 301 pages
...words, "it is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery we have made that we exist. The discovery is called the Fall of Man. Ever afterwards...learned that we do not see directly, but mediately" (487). In vain as well is William James's plea in A Pluralistic Universe (1908) that we stop what he...
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Impersonality: Seven Essays

Sharon Cameron - 2009 - 272 pages
...of will, of possession), he implicitly insists we recognize the connection in a central remark: "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...learned that we do not see directly, but mediately.... Perhaps there are no objects" (E 487). We are invited to take this declaration two ways. One emphasizes...
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Emerson and Eros: The Making of a Cultural Hero

Len Gougeon - 2012 - 278 pages
...the psychological significance of this mythic event in the essay "Experience" in which he states: "It is very unhappy, but too late to be helped, the discovery...exist. That discovery is called the Fall of Man." 68 Mankind's freedom, represented here as freedom from "original sin," is therefore contingent upon...
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