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" In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over ; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he... "
The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with a biogr. and critical preface ... - Page 283
by Spectator The - 1853
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Annual Report of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society, Volume 15

Wisconsin State Horticultural Society - 1885
...to deal with. In a word, whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, is soon over; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual,...a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, eo that he is not believed when he speaks the truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When...
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Transactions of the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Volume 23

Wisconsin State Agricultural Society - 1885
...have to deal with. In a word, whatever convemence may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, is soon over; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual,...a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, eo that he is not believed when he speaks the truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When...
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English Composition and Rhetoric, Part 1

Alexander Bain - 1890 - 292 pages
...falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it bring* a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion,...is not believed when he speaks truth, nor trusted perhaps when he nn-ans homstly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is...
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English Composition & Rhetoric, Part 1

Alexander Bain - 1890 - 352 pages
...like Tillotson, usually fall into loose constructions: — ' In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it bring* a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks...
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April's Lady: A Novel

Duchess - 1891 - 314 pages
...thing only," feverishly. " That I hope I shall never see you again ! " CHAPTER XLVIII. " When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood." WHEN he is gone Joyce draws a deep breath. For a moment it seems to her that it is all over — a disagreeable...
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The Library of Choice Literature and Encyclopædia of Universal Authorship ...

Ainsworth Rand Spofford, Charles Gibbon - 1893
...journey's end than byways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a_ man underan everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks truth,...
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Treasury of Thought: Forming an Encyclopædia of Quotations from Ancient and ...

Maturin Murray Ballou - 1894 - 579 pages
...false imposition ; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving. — Shakespeare. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. — Tillotson. An honest reputation is within the reach of all men ; they obtain it by social virtues,...
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Selections from the Spectator of Addison and Steele

A. Meserole - 1896 - 410 pages
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practices it. " Whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set fast, and nothing will then serve his...
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The Spectator, Volume 2

George Gregory Smith - 1897
...Dis^ appointment of him that practises it 'Whatsoever Convenience may be thought to be in Falshood and Dissimulation, it is soon over; but the Inconvenience...perpetual, because it brings a Man under an everlasting Tealousie and Suspicion, so that he is not believ'd when ne speaks Truth, nor trusted when perhaps...
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The Spectator, Volume 2

George Gregory Smith - 1897 - 356 pages
...the Disappointment of him that practises it, 'Whatsoever Convenience may be thought to be in Falshood and Dissimulation, it is soon over; but the Inconvenience...perpetual, because it brings a Man under an everlasting Jealousie and Suspicion, so that he is not believ'd when he speaks Truth, nor trusted when perhaps...
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