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" In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over ; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he... "
The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with a biogr. and critical preface ... - Page 283
by Spectator The - 1853
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The English Instructor: Being a Collection of Pieces in Prose, Selected from ...

1830 - 263 pages
...word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be ill falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over '9 ; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because...jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed, when hespeaks truth, nor trusted, when perhaps be means honestly2°. When a man hath once forfeited the...
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The Academical Reader: Comprising Selections from the Most Admired Authors ...

John J. Harrod - 1832 - 324 pages
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. 9. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...is not believed when he speaks truth, nor trusted, perhaps, when he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...
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Illustrations of Lying: In All Its Branches

Amelia Opie - 1832 - 224 pages
...his journey than byways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a manjmder an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks truth, nor...
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The Rule of Life: Or a Collection of Select Moral Sentences ...

Watson Adams - 1834 - 264 pages
...reason stands as firm as the foundation of the earth. Reason is ever allied to truth. . When a man hath forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. Spec. talor. There are lying looks, as well as lying words ; dissembling smiles, deceiving signs, and...
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The Saturday Magazine, Volume 8

1836
...dry by them if it raine, according to some streets in Chester cyttie." WHATSOEVER convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. STEELE. WITH what astonishment and veneration may we look into our own souls, where there are such...
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Spectator (The)

1836 - 714 pages
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practises it. " Whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set fast, and nothing will then serve bis...
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The Elocutionist: Consisting of Declamations and Readings in Prose and ...

Jonathan Barber - 1836 - 392 pages
...troublesome, and needs a great many more to make it good. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...suspicion ; so that he is not believed when he speaks the truih ; nor trusted when, perhaps, he means honestly. When a man hath once forfeited the reputation...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator, no. 315-635

Joseph Addison - 1837
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when Ъе speaks the truth, nor trusted perhaps when he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator, no. 1-314

Joseph Addison - 1837
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practises it. ' Whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under m everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so :hat he is not believed when he speaks :ruth, nor trusted...
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The National Preceptor: Or, Selections in Prose and Poetry; Consisting of ...

Jesse Olney - 1838 - 336 pages
...may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over ; but the inconveniencc of it in perpetual, because it brings a man under an everlasting...hath once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. 10. Indeed, if a man were only to deal...
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