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" In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over ; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he... "
The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with a biogr. and critical preface ... - Page 283
by Spectator The - 1853
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Materials for Translating from English Into German

Adolph Heimann - 1851 - 210 pages
...in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, oecause it brings a man under an everlasting jealousy and...hath once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. Indeed, if a man were only to deal in...
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The Literature and the Literary Men of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 2

Abraham Mills - 1851
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not .believed when ho speaks truth, nor trusted perhaps when he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation...
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The Spectator: With a Biographical and Critical Preface, and Explanatory ...

1853
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practises it. " Whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. STEELE. R. No. 104. FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1711. Harpalyce Qualis equos Thrcissa fatigat VIRO. xs. i. 320....
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A class-book of elocution

J H. Aitken - 1853 - 360 pages
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth...
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Select specimens of English prose [ed.] by E. Hughes

Edward Hughes - 1853
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...is not believed when he speaks truth, nor trusted, perhaps, when he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...
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The Spectator [by J. Addison and others] with sketches of the ..., Volumes 1-2

Spectator The - 1853
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practises it. ' Whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks the truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man hath once forfeited the reputation...
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The Spectator

1853 - 742 pages
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practices it. " Whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, BO that he is not believed when he speaks truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a...
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The Spectator [by J. Addison and others] with sketches of the ..., Volumes 7-8

Spectator The - 1853
...journey 'send than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever conveniences may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...because it brings a man under an everlasting jealousy a .id suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means...
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The World's Laconics: Or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors

Tryon Edwards - 1853 - 432 pages
...will find it an arduous task to rekindle it again. — Easy Guide, SC REPUTATION. — When a man hath forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. — Stcele. REPUTATION. — If a man were only to deal in the world for a day, and should never have...
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The National Preceptor: Or, Selections in Prose and Poetry: Consisting of ...

Jesse Olney - 1854 - 324 pages
...word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be ! n falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over;-but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings...everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not bclievci! when he speaks truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man hath once forfeited...
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