Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over ; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he... "
The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with a biogr. and critical preface ... - Page 283
by Spectator The - 1853
Full view - About this book

The Spectator: With a Biographical and Critical Preface, and Explanatory ...

1854
...he is not believed when he speaks truth, nor trusted perhaps when he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. " And I have often thought that God hath in his great wisdom hid from men of false and dishonest minds,...
Full view - About this book

Laconics, Or The Best Words of the Best Authors

1856
...passed in review before one or other of these wealthy relicts. — Spectator. Dccccxn. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. — Tillotton. DCCCCXIIL There are peculiar ways in men, which discover what they are, through the...
Full view - About this book

The Spectator [by J. Addison and others].

Spectator The - 1857
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practises it. " Whatsoever convenience may be st unfortunately a very beautiful uiole on the tory...to her enemies to misrepresent her face, as though houestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set fast, and nothing...
Full view - About this book

Exercises on translation from English into French for the use of students ...

Jules Bué - 1857
...falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over, but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because kit brings a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion,...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth...
Full view - About this book

Exercises on translation from English into French for the use of students ...

Jules Bué - 1857
...over, but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because kit brings a man under an everlasting jealous}' and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth...
Full view - About this book

The Literature and the Literary Men of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 2

Abraham Mills - 1858
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a fflaa under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he ipeaks truth,...
Full view - About this book

Materials for Translating from English Into German

Adolph Heimann - 1859
...journey's end than bye -ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...hath once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. Indeed, if a man were only to deal in...
Full view - About this book

A class-book of English prose, with biogr. notices, explanatory notes and ...

Robert Demaus - 1859
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth...
Full view - About this book

The Prose and Prose Writers of Britain from Chaucer to Ruskin: With ...

Robert Demaus - 1860 - 552 pages
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth...
Full view - About this book

The Moral Design of Freemasonry: Deduced from the Old Charges of a Freemason

Samuel Lawrence - 1860 - 237 pages
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when, perhaps, he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set fast, and nothing will then serve his...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF