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" In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over ; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he... "
The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with a biogr. and critical preface ... - Page 283
by Spectator The - 1853
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The Spectator: With Notes, and a General Index. The Eight Volumes Comprised ...

1822 - 788 pages
...must naturally tend to tbe disappointment of him that practises it. ' Whatsoever convenience may be tor they gave wh'enhe speaks truth, nor trusted when perhaps he meanshoneslly . When a man hath once forfeited the...
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The British Essayists: Spectator

James Ferguson - 1823
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of htm that practises it. * Whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood.' R. N- 104. FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1711. Quitlis equos Tlireiisa fatigot flarpalyce • VIRO. JEn. i. J16....
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Handbuch der englischen sprache und literature, Volume 1

H. Nolte - 1823
...journey's end, than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. And I have often thought, that God hath in great wisdom hid from men of false and dishonest minds the...
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The Speaker: Or Miscellaneous Pieces, Selected from the Best English Writers ...

William Enfield - 1823 - 346 pages
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...hath once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. ' •• Indeed, if a man were only...
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The British essayists, with prefaces by A. Chalmers, Volumes 9-10

British essayists - 1823
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose, themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set fast ; and nothing will then serve his...
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The British Essayists: Spectator

Lionel Thomas Berguer - 1823
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set fast; and nothing will then serve his...
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Lessons in Elocution: Or, a Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse for the ...

William Scott - 1823 - 372 pages
...journey's end than by ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks the truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man hath once forfeited the reputation...
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The Republican, Volume 8

Richard Carlile - 1823 - 816 pages
...and longer any man practiseth it, the greater service it does him, by confirming his reputation: for when a man hath once forfeited the reputation of his...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood." Thus far the Spectator, and who is there who will not agree in the principle, if they do not adopt...
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The Spectator: With Sketches of the Lives of the Authors, an Index ..., Volume 7

1824
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever conveniences may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set fast, and nothing will then serve his...
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The Spectator, Volume 1

Joseph Addison - 1824 - 278 pages
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practises it. ' Whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks the truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man hath once forfeited the reputation...
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