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" In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over ; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under an everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he... "
The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with a biogr. and critical preface ... - Page 283
by Spectator The - 1853
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Duties of Young Men: Exhibited in Six Lectures; with an Anniversary Address ...

Edwin Hubbell Chapin - 1840 - 212 pages
...which they confide their interests in their transactions with you. " When a man," saya Tillotson, " has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood." Integrity is the vital element of all intercourse among men. With perfect trust in the good faith of...
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A System of Elocution: With Special Reference to Gesture, to the Treatment ...

Andrew Comstock - 1841 - 364 pages
...troublesome, | and needs a great many more to make it good. \ In a vtord, | whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, | it...suspicion ; | so that he is not believed when he speaks the truth ; | nor trusted when, perhaps, he means honestly. | When a man hath once forfeited the reputation...
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The Works of Joseph Addison, Volumes 1-2

Joseph Addison - 1842
...must naturally tend to the disappointment of him that practises it 1 Whatsoever convenience may be deer-s in everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks iruth, nor trusted...
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Class Book of Prose: Consisting of Selections from Distinguished English and ...

John Seely Hart - 1845 - 372 pages
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...is not believed when he speaks truth, nor trusted perhaps when he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is...
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The rhetorical reader, consisting of choice specimens of oratorical ...

John Hall Hindmarsh - 1845 - 80 pages
...because it brings a man under an everlasting jea'lousy and sus'picion, so that he i's-not-believed/ when he speaks tru'th, nor tru'sted/ when/ perha'ps/...once forfeited the reputa'tion of his inte'grity, nothing will the'n serve his tu'rn, neither truth nor falsehood. Indee'd, if a man were only to deal...
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Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 17

Charles Dickens, William Harrison Ainsworth, Albert Smith - 1845
...GAOL CHAPLAIN; OR, A DARK PAGE FROM LIFE'S VOLUME. CHAPTER LI. A RIGHTEOUS TREASURER. " When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood." TILLOTSON. " Business ! business ! " was the cry. The minutes would be inexpedient and unjust ; the...
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Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 17

Charles Dickens, William Harrison Ainsworth, Albert Smith - 1845
...GAOL CHAPLAIN; OK, A DARK PAGE FROM LIFE'S VOLUME. CHAPTER II. A RIGHTEOUS TREASURER. " When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he...then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood." TlLLOTBON. " Business ! business ! " was the cry. The minutes would be inexpedient and unjust ; the...
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National Preceptor

Jesse Olney - 1845 - 336 pages
...convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over; but the inconvenienee of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under...everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not beheved when he speaks truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly. When a man hath once forfeited...
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The literary class book; or, Readings in English literature

Robert Joseph Sullivan - 1850
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...hath once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood. Indeed, if a man were only to deal in...
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The Literature and the Literary Men of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 2

Abraham Mills - 1851
...journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves. In a word, whatsoever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is...is not believed when he speaks truth, nor trusted perhaps when he means honestly. When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is...
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